“New Chief for the Brazilian FAA”

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“She’s easy on the eyes, too!” gushed Dinheiro magazine — which has something of an Institutional Investor meets People-like predilection for the hagiographical approach to business journalism — in 1999.

Economist Solange Paiva Vieira, a career employee of the national development bank, BNDES, joined Defense on August 9 with a grand mission: Put an end to the duopoly in the Brazilian civil aviation market.

Nelson Jobim anuncia nome de nova presidente da Anac: Defense Minister Nelson Jobim finishes the job of replacing the leadership of ANAC, the National Civil Aviation Agency, which is, paradoxically, still part of the defense portfolio.

The former Senator, Justice minister, president of the PMDB, justice of the Supreme Court, and presiding justice of the federal elections tribunal in 2002 — which turned out differently than the 1989 ones, famously — says things like “regulatory agencies are there to get results, so if they are not getting results, they have no reason for existing.”

Among other hard-nosed things.

Interesting situation. The general line of speechifying from Jobim in his approach to the difficulties of Brazilian civil aviation, I like to quip, seems to have been borrowed from wrestler Rowdy Roddy Piper: “I have come here to kick butt and chew bubblegum. And I’m all out of bubblegum.”

Appointed to run the show is economist Solange Paiva Vieira, “a career civil servant from BNDES,” the national development bank. A quick, admiring biographical sketch from the G1 (Globo) news portal:

Ao assumir o Ministério da Defesa no governo Lula, Nelson Jobim, que foi ministro da Justiça entre 1º de janeiro de 1995 e 7 de abril de 1997, levou aos bastidores da política em Brasília uma famosa personagem dos tempos do governo FHC, quando foi considerada a ‘musa da esplanada’.

When he took over the Defense portfolio in the Lula government, Jobim, who was Minister of Justice between January 1, 1995 and April 7, 1997, brought in a famous figure from the Cardoso government, where she was called, “the muse of the Esplanade.”   

Dinheiro magazine called her “the muse of social security,” credited with discovering a technical method for avoiding a deadly future deficit.

A economista Solange Paiva Vieira, funcionária de carreira do BNDES, assumiu a assessoria do ministério da Defesa no último dia 9 de agosto com uma grande missão: acabar com o duopólio no mercado de aviação civil no Brasil.

Economist Solange Paiva Vieira, a career employee of the national development bank, BNDES, joined Defense on August 9 with a grand mission: Put an end to the duopoly in the Brazilian civil aviation market. 

Aiding and abetting the Stalinist plot to grow formal employment, redistribute income, stimulate economic growth and new business creation, and reform the tax system so that everyone pays their fair share and the average tax burden can be reduced without cutting social programs.

Want to bet that someone ends up calling her a traitor to the Ayn Rand school of jingoistic, faith-based global capitalism?

Sergio Lirio interviewed her for Dinheiro magazine in 1999.

I just picked up a copy yesterday, while we were out seeing Querô, a new project from one of the scriptwriters on City of God. It focuses on the tragic life of a street kid on the mean streets of Santos, the port city of São Paulo.

It has been a long time since I have read Dinheiro, and I need to start seriously figuring out what biz rags are most worth reading.

On the cover of this week’s edition: more on the spies and mafias angle to the strange and twisted saga of Brasil Telecom and Telecom Itália/

Leonardo Attuch keeps promising us a version of the tale in which the murky factoids raised by the Gutenberg affair — journalists accused of taking payoffs to influence business deals — make someone else look bad, not him. Seriously. He came back from Milan full of piss and vinegar about how he was going to run a cover story that would vindicate him.

When you become the story, you can no longer report the story. Fairly or unfairly.

This seems to be the other shoe falling.

Weird, weird story.

I have been doing some reading in the Banestado files — the CPI of the End of the World of the Brazilian art of tax evasion — to try to get oriented. But it is heavy, heavy sledding. Fear and misinformation abound, David Sasaki-style.

Sozinhas, TAM e Gol controlam cerca de 90% dos vôos comerciais no Brasil, controle que vai de encontro ao pensamento do ministro, que tenta fortalecer as empresas regionais, que, atualmente, controlam menos de 3% do mercado.

Between them, TAM and Gol control nearly 90% of commercial flights in Brazil, a degree of control that runs counter to the minister’s way of thinking, which is to strengthen regional carriers, which currently control less than 3% of the market.

A dura missão exige alguém à sua altura. E Solange tem um histórico que faz jus à missão. Em 2001, a economista criou embaraços como secretária de Previdência Complementar do então ministro da Previdência, Roberto Brant. Considerada “linha-dura” pelo ministro, Solange foi demitida após colocar na internet, com acesso restrito, a lista dos principais devedores dos fundos de pensão estatais.

This difficult mission demands someone who is up to the job. And Solange has a history to match. In 2001, as secretary of supplementary social security under then-minister Roberto Brant, she made considerable waves. Considered “hardline” by the minister, Solange was fired after posting a list of the principal debtors of the state pension funds on the Internet, with restricted access.

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